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“Fast Five”
a review by Darby O’Gill

It’s hard to imagine that there have already been five Fast & Furious movies, but even more amazing than that is the fact that they’ve also seemed to be only getting better as they go! What started as a blatant rip-off of Point Break has somehow turned into a truly refreshing movie franchise. I know! I’m just as surprised as you are! The last installment was great, and this one’s even better! I wouldn’t have called myself a fan of the first three movies. The Fast and the Furious wasn’t terribly original, but it was entertaining just the same. And to be honest, I hadn’t even seen the other two until just before the release of the fourth film. 2 Fast 2 Furious seemed like a bad joke, but it wasn’t that bad. I was really surprised to find it fairly enjoyable. Tokyo Drift on the other hand was clearly a desperate attempt to sell more movie tickets by slapping the Fast and the Furious nametag on to it, although it clearly paved the way for the franchise’s revival. When director Justin Lin added the small cameo of Dom, played by Vin Diesel, at the end of Tokyo Drift, I think that in that moment he managed to open the true potential of this series. By realizing the characters themselves is what makes these movies great, and not necessarily the cars and street racing, Lin managed to persuade the principle characters of the original cast to return for the franchise’s fourth installment. Oddly tiled Fast & Furious, I’m not really sure how removing “The” from the original title makes it a new title and not just confusing, but that’s not really important. What is important is that the fourth movie was not only as good as the original, but it might even be better due to the fact that it was way more original than the original. Still with me?

In the fifth installment, Fast Five, Brian O’Conner played by Paul Walker, and Dom, find themselves on the run from the law once again, and hiding out in Rio de Janeiro. But, when an easy money job goes bad, it’s not just the law that’s after them this time, but one of Brazil’s most corrupt and powerful businessmen. But when the opportunity arises to pull one last job for an insane amount of money that will almost definitely ensure them a life of no more running, the choice is clear. Dom and Brian have to pull off the impossible, and to do so they’ll need the help of some old friends. Calling back not only the original cast, but cast members from all the previous installments, Fast Five is clearly the most character driven films of the franchise, which is what I think makes it the best of the series so far. The addition of federal agent Luke Hobbs, played by Dwayne Johnson, not only adds to the ever growing list of characters, but also gives us one hell of a fist fight! I’m not kidding. This is one for the books… Um, pictures?! You know what I mean! This showdown totally kicks ass! And, yes… I do realize that I’m talking about a Fast & Furious movie here. Look, this is a summer movie at its best, and yes you have to suspend your disbelief at times, but I for one am looking forward to Furious Six in the near future!

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“Scream 4”
a review by Darby O’Gill

The movie that changed the face of horror is back, and this time with a whole new set of rules. It’s hard to believe that it’s been 15 years since the first Scream movie came out, and just a little over 10 years now since Scream 3. One would even wonder if we needed a fourth installment to the Scream franchise, especially when three already seemed like one too many. But luckily for us, screenwriter Kevin Williamson has also returned this time around, and has brought a bit of that old fun creativity back with him. The one thing that made the original Scream so amazing was its outstanding writing. Sure, it wasn’t Shakespeare. But, there’s no denying that it was the writing that made that movie the classic it is today. And with Facebook, Twitter, and a whole new style of horror movies emerging in the last 10 years, Williamson had an opportunity play with some new ideas.

In Scream 4, Sidney Prescott, played by Neve Campbell, has finally written a book that tells her side of the story, and is somehow talked into finishing her national book tour in Woodsboro, on the anniversary of the first killing. With the return of Sidney, the anniversary, and yet another installment of the popular Stab movie series, wouldn’t you know someone else wants to try their hand at being the Ghostface Killer. Dewey, played by David Arquette, and Gale Weathers, played by Courteney Cox, are now married and currently living in Woodsboro, where Dewey is the town Sheriff. They also introduced a new generation of teens, along with the idea that the killer might not be playing by the rules of a sequel this time around, and might actually be looking for a 21st Century reboot!

I’ve got to say, I enjoyed Scream 4 more than the last two sequels, but I still think they could have taken it a little bit further. Although, having Kevin Williamson back in the screenwriter’s chair is a big help, they did have a few opportunities in this script to take the franchise in a whole new direction, but in the end, they ultimately ended up sticking to the same old format. Well, that’s not completely fair. There is a new twist to Scream 4, and not one that I think most people will see coming, but I think the biggest problem the Scream series has always had to deal with is the fact that the killer, or killers, have always clearly died at the end of each movie. The other big problem is that the movie isn’t about the Ghostface Killer, it’s about Sidney, Dewey, and Gale! With Freddy, Michael, and Jason, the movies are always about them, the rest of the cast is replaceable. It’s easy to bring back the unstoppable killing machine once they’ve been established, and at one point in Scream 4 (without giving anything away) they could have easily done that. I’m not saying that it would have been a good thing for the series, but it would have at least been different, and maybe even a new direction you didn’t see coming this time around. Scream 4 manages to keep the audience guessing, and has more red herrings than you can shake a stick at, but it is definitely a welcomed addition to the series.

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“Your Highness”
a review by Darby O’Gill

A ye old tale from long ago, of two brothers, one brave and true, and the other… Well, a bit of a lazy sissy boy. Your Highness is from the same people that brought you Pineapple Express, and although the title would lead you to think otherwise, the movie has nothing to do with pot. The aforementioned sissy boy, Thadeous played by Danny McBride, lives the luscious life of a prince, without any of the pesky responsibilities. That’s largely in thanks to his older brother Fabious, played by James Franco, who is next in line to one day be King. With the no pressure, or real purpose, Thadeous spends his days frolicking with his servant Courtney, played by Ramus Hardiker. That’s not to say that Thadeous doesn’t take himself seriously. He believes that he is much braver and better suited to one day be King. He’d be wrong, but none the less he still believes it. But, when his brother’s fiancé is kidnapped by an evil wizard on the day of their wedding, the King decides that it is high-time that Thadeous prove himself on a proper quest, and Your Highness is the story of that quest.

I’ve got to say, I didn’t think this was going to be anything more than a bunch of dick and fart stoner jokes, but it turned out to be more of a throw back to films of old, like The Princess Bride or Clash of the Titans. The good one! (Not that 3D piece of shit from a few years ago.) I was really shocked! I wasn’t the biggest fan of Pineapple Express. I thought it was funny and had it’s moments, but not a classic by any means, and I think the same is true for Your Highness. Although, I did like it a lot more than Pineapple. Danny McBride is great! He’s at the top of his game, and doing what he does best. The relationship between McBride and James Franco is outstanding! And, Franco continues to surprise me! He’s the kind of actor I don’t think of very often. That is, until I’ll hear about him in a movie, and think that doesn’t sound like something I can picture James Franco doing, but then he’s great! And, where do we even begin with Natalie Portman?! Say what you will about her Oscar win, she was hands-down last year’s MVP. She’s had three back-to-back movies come out in the last three months, and they were all good! Do you know how hard that is to pull off? Some people can’t even put out one good movie a year. Your Highness is not Oscar worthy, but much like Paul, it’s a fun ride that will make you laugh.

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“Paul”
a review by Darby O’Gill

Throughout the history of cinema we have always had our share of great comedic duo teams, Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy, Bud Abbott & Lou Costello, Burt Reynolds & Dom DeLuise, David Spade & Chris Farley, and now Simon Pegg & Nick Frost. Okay, that might be a little bit of a grand statement, but I’ve got to say it’s one that I’m proud to stand behind. From Spaced to Hot Fuzz, Pegg and Frost have more than earned their place on that list. In their newest team-up, they find themselves on the run from the men in black with a little help of the third kind.

In Paul, illustrator Graeme Willy (Simon Pegg) and aspiring sci-fi writer Clive Gollings (Nick Frost) have ventured across the pond on holiday to attend the Holy Grail of all nerd events, the San Diego Comic-Con! However, the Comic-Con is just the beginning of the duo’s epic adventure. Having rented an RV, Graeme and Clive plan to visit all the UFO hot spots the American Southwest has to offer, from Area 51 to the infamous UFO crash site in Roswell, New Mexico. But, their plans quickly change when in the desert just outside Area 51, they stumble upon a real life alien named Paul (voiced by Seth Rogen). Now on the run from government agents that want Paul back, the boys will do their best to help their new alien friend get home.

Paul might not be an instant classic, or even in line for an Oscar anytime soon, but it’s a fun ride just the same. I really had a good time watching this one, and can’t wait to see it again. It’s just fun to watch Pegg & Frost do their thing, even if it is without the help of good friend Edgar Wright. That’s not to say that Wright was completely left out of the making of Paul. There’s a nice little nod in one of the scenes, to the movie Edgar was filming at the time of Paul. In the comic book shop in Roswell, there is a rack full of Scott Pilgrim trades proudly on display. This movie is full of little gems like that. With so many science-fiction movies, comic book and pop culture references in it, Paul has definitely set a record. I would almost say there are too many, but somehow it works. I think having so many in the film, gives the movie a little bit of a leeway. Well, that and the fact that Graeme and Clive are a pair of hopeless nerds, who would most likely talk like that. The other thing that really helps you enjoy this movie is the character of Paul himself. Seth Rogen does such a great job of breathing life into this fully culturally integrated spaceman. I love that he is constantly pointing out the misconceptions of alien stereotypes, and has a true gift for stating the obvious. Did I mention that Paul is also the idea man (well, alien) behind some of our greatest science fiction? Well, he is! Paul is truly the ultimate fanboy road trip movie!

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“The Adjustment Bureau”
a review by Darby O’Gill

Fate is a tricky thing. Some would say that you’re in control of the outcome of your own life, and others would say it is all just part of the master plan. And, both might just be right; well that’s to say if there is any truth to the new Matt Damon film, The Adjustment Bureau. Based on a short story by Philip K. Dick, The Adjustment Bureau brings a Hitchcockian take to Dick’s usual “what if” theories. I’m a big fan of his work including: Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly to name just a few. But what is really great about writer/director George Nolfi’s take on “The Adjustment Team,” is his non-Hollywood approach to the material. Most filmmakers would want the agents of the Adjustment Bureau to be these gun toting, bad-ass “do as we say or we’ll end you” type of characters, but Nolfi opted to go the exact opposite direction with his bureau. They do impose authority, but at the same time they also have this sense of the common man, even though they are clearly implied as not being human. I don’t want to give too much away, so I’ll just leave it at that. But, it’s Nolfi’s realistic look at this sci-fi, if not supernatural world, that really makes this movie something you might not expect.

In The Adjustment Bureau, Matt Damon plays David Norris an up-and-coming politician on the brink of winning a seat in the U.S. Senate. But, when his first campaign for the Senate seat fails, the wind seems to be taken out of David’s sails and it could mean the end of his political career. That’s where fate needs to step in, or I should say the Adjustment Bureau? You see, David Norris has a much bigger role to play in the grand scheme of things, which is why the bureau has been watching him for quite some time so that his life can continue to go according to the master plan. In order to insure that David stays on track, the bureau sets up a chance meeting for him in a men’s room with a contemporary dancer named Elise, played by Emily Blunt. They hope that Elise’s free spirit will inspire David to give a speech that will set his political path back on track. Now, I’ve heard a lot of critics and people talking about this film, and it amazes me just how many people have no real idea of the reasoning behind the conflict in this movie. Most people think that David gets into trouble with the bureau because he manages to meet Elise again on a city bus. But, the real reason is that he makes it to his office 10 minutes earlier than he was supposed to, and sees the bureau when he shouldn’t have. The Elise thing is just a coincidence, one that later is revealed to be a much bigger problem, and yes ultimately becomes the new conflict. But this whole thing starts because of solar panels, not Elise.

I really liked The Adjustment Bureau! It was really well done. Now, I got to see a test screening for The Adjustment Bureau last year, and even though I really liked it, the ending kind of knocked the rating down a bit for me. But, I’m very glad to report that that ending is no longer in the film. (If you would like to know the alternate ending, I’ll be posting it in the comment section.) There are a few holes here and there when it comes to the inner working of the bureau, but they can easily be forgiven. Matt Damon and Emily Blunt have amazing chemistry together and really carry the supernatural premise of this movie into a romantic thriller. As I mentioned before, the personality and attitude of the bureau agents was great, I think having it be just like any other job to them was a brilliant move. I like that even when they call in the heavy hitter Thompson, played by General Zod himself Terence Stamp, he’s still a normal Joe. Sure he’s a little bit more cold-hearted than the others, but at no point does he threaten or use violence to get the job done. He just doesn’t sugarcoat it for David. There need to be more movies like this! The more I think about this move the more I like. It might be a bit early, but I think it’s safe to say The Adjustment Bureau will be in the running for a few Banshees next year.

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“Take Me Home Tonight”
a review by Darby O’Gill

Did you ever wish you could relive the ‘80s? Well, at least the late ‘80s? How about the first weekend of September in 1988? While we’re at it, did you ever wish that you could have a roly-poly best friend/sidekick, kind of like Curtis Armstrong… You know, Booger from those Revenge of the Nerds movies? You have!? Well guess what!? You’re in luck, because that’s exactly the weekend and type of buddy you’re going to get in the new movie Take Me Home Tonight! Wow, that’s weird! I mean, what are the odds of you wanting to see a movie that’s based on the exact weekend I was just telling you to think of? Pretty heavy stuff, huh?

In Take Me Home Tonight, Topher Grace plays Matt, a recent graduate of MIT that finds himself hiding from the real world as a Suncoast Video employee. Which is a great way to hide from the real world fresh out of college, I should know, I was a Suncoast manager straight out of college myself. Joined by his twin sister Wendy, played by Anna Faris, and his afore mentioned Boogeresque best friend Barry, played by Dan Fogler, the trio seem to have but just one last weekend to celebrate their ill spent youth. For some reason, this Labor Day weekend in 1988 is the last chance they’ll ever have to do it. I’m not really sure why, but let’s just go with it. And, it also seems more like life after high school, but it’s not, so don’t get confused. Add to the mix the return of Matt’s secret high school crush, played by Teresa Palmer, and you’ve got the makings of… Okay, it’s starting to sound like I didn’t like this movie at all, which couldn’t be further from the truth. I actually really liked it! I mean sure it’s got its share of plot holes, and maybe it is a John Hughes high school movie that actually lets its actors play their real age for once, but overall it’s still really a good movie. Man, that still sounds like sarcasm!

All kidding aside, Take Me Home Tonight is a pretty good movie. Most retro ‘80s movies are made just so the filmmakers can take a bunch of potshots at banana clips and leg warmers, but this movie is more like a period piece. Okay, that might be pushing it, but it does feel that way. Topher Grace does a nice job of grounding the movie, even when the night’s events get a little wild, and the subject of not knowing what you ultimately want to do with your life can speak to just about everyone these days. Overall, I had fun watching it and would gladly see it again. I don’t think it’s going to become a classic by any means, but it will take you back.

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“TRON: Legacy”
a review by Darby O’Gill

It’s finally here! After years of waiting… Flynn lives! I, like may others, have been looking forward to the release of TRON: Legacy for quite sometime. And, now that it’s here, it’s time to answer the million-dollar question… Was it worth it? Ah… Yes?! It’s not an easy question. Look, the first TRON is a classic! It was the birth of computer animation as we know it, and yet it’s not really that great of a movie. It was slow, and the story didn’t always work. When you look at it today it looks like a caveman chiseling a wheel, but then again that’s exactly what it was. TRON: Legacy is much like it’s predecessor in that aspect. It’s not really that great of a movie, but it’s not bad either. It’s just not the greatest movie ever made, and yet that kind of makes me like it even more. Confused? Don’t be. This movie has more in common with its first film, than most sequels do these days, even if that’s not a good thing, it still kind of works.

The story begins with the disappearance of software and game developer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), and then picks-up again 26 years later when his son Sam (Garrett Hedlund) finds his father’s old workshop in the back of the now closed Flynn’s Arcade. Sam, much like his father before him, finds himself unintentionally transported to the Grid, a living environment inside of a computer system, where programs live and work. They’re also forced to play games, and if they lose they will find themselves derezzed and erased from the system. So, you know… No pressure. Now, not to give anything away, but we do get to find out what has become of TRON. But to be honest, the filmmakers seem to try and throw in some surprises for the viewers that just don’t work. It’s not that they’re bad, it’s just that they don’t really fool anyone. And if you haven’t seen it yet, don’t worry I’m sure you would have figured it out on your own, even without my little hint.

I don’t think TRON: Legacy lived up to my expectations, but then again how could it? I mean, when you have years to look forward to a movie you almost always over hype it for yourself. I did enjoy myself though, and would gladly see it again. One of the things I thought could have been better was its use of the 3D. I love that the 3D experience didn’t begin until Sam was in the Grid, but I would have liked some more in your face 3D. I know, in the past I’ve always praised 3D movies for not using the cheesy in your face approach, but I think it would have been great here. I really wanted Identity Discs to be flying straight at me. The 3D gave some really nice depth, but overall it was just under utilized. The CGI recreation of Jeff Bridges’ younger Clu character was at times, amazing! However, to be honest there are a few times, if not more, where Clu’s CGI is painfully obvious. But, if you want to be really nerdy about it, you can justify it by saying Clu is a computer program, so he should look computer generated. Don’t judge me! The music by Daft Punk is outstanding! Add that to the mind blowing visual effects, and it all really helps to immerse you into the world of TRON. The costumes have an outstanding sense of the original look, and manage to make silly looking tights look rather bad-ass. Never the less, TRON: Legacy, much like TRON, may not be a good movie, but I’m sure it will be just as beloved.


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“How Do You Know”
a review by Darby O’Gill

It sucks! How do you know? Well, for one I had to sit through it. So, I think I’m pretty sure about that statement. The sad thing is that it shouldn’t suck at all. I normally like James L. Brooks, but How Do You Know misses the mark so much that I’m almost embarrassed for him. The worst part about watching this movie is that I had to watch it in this really small theatre with Mr. Brooks sitting directly behind me. To say it was one of the most uncomfortable viewings I’ve ever had would be a major understatement. I’m pretty sure it tested horribly that night, and I think it’s safe to say I don’t think anyone in the theatre truly enjoyed it, but yet here it is in theatres. The test screening was only three or four weeks ago, and when I got done watching it I was sure they were going to push back the release, because re-writes and re-shoots of like a third of this movie was the only way of saving it really. I mean what’s the point of the test screening if you’re just going to release the movie as is regardless? It’s not like they didn’t know! When I was leaving the theatre I could hear James L. Brooks and a bunch of suits talking about how badly it played. I just don’t get it.

In How Do You Know, Lisa (Reese Witherspoon) is a pro softball player on the US Women’s Olympic softball team, who’s just been cut because she’s getting a little too old to play. After being cut, she falls back on her on-again-off-again relationship with pro-ballplayer (Owen Wilson). At the same time, George Madison (Paul Rudd) runs a business founded by his father, Charles (Jack Nicholson), and is currently being charged with securities fraud and is about to be indicted. The characters in this movie are as unsure of what they want, as the movie is about it’s trying to say with the story. It’s truly a mess. There are a few funny moments, but not nearly enough to warrant it worth seeing. It’s not just the writing either, the acting is horrible as well. Witherspoon looks like she’s trying out for a high school play at times, and Jack Nicholson is totally phoning it in. Like I said, it’s just sad. One of the best moments is when George literally runs away from bad news. Sadly, the truth is Paul Rudd should have run away from this movie when he had the chance. Needless to say, you should skip this one all together.

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“Tangled”
a review by Darby O’Gill

Just when you thought Disney was all out of princesses, Rapunzel lets down her hair and pulls out another hit. Tangled marks the 50th installment of the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, and even though it might not be one of the best, it definitely doesn’t disappoint. I think it’s safe to say that Pixar and DreamWorks Animation have clearly stolen a lot of Disney’s animated thunder over the last few years, but why is that? It might just be a sign of the times, but I don’t think computer animation has anything to do with it. If I didn’t know better, I would have thought Tangled was a completely computer animated film, which it is sort of. They used both hand-drawn and CGI techniques to help bring Tangled to life. I don’t think the look really matters though, and when it comes down to it, it’s not the animation style that makes a great movie. It helps, but the story itself is what really brings an animated tale to life. Okay, well when you say it like that you do sound kind of stupid. What I mean to say is that the story is what connects to the audience and ultimately holds their interest. If you took one of the Toy Story movies and remade it word for word with the old school hand-drawn animation, I would be willing to bet it would still be one of the best animated movies of all time!

In Tangled, Rapunzel (Mandy Moore) was born with magical hair, and when she was just a baby, she was kidnapped by an old hermit lady who knew of her hair’s magical powers. She then locked Rapunzel away in a tower, raised her as her own, and for eighteen years told her of the dangers of the outside world, keeping her an unknowing prisoner. That is until the dangerous outside world came to her. When the outlaw Flynn Ryder (Zachary Levi) decides to use her nicely isolated tower as a hiding place to lay low after stealing a priceless item from the castle, he not only is shocked to find someone living there, but quickly finds himself being blackmailed into playing tour guide for Rapunzel’s first outing into the world.

The movie has some great moments and fantastic animation in it, but it also has musical numbers as well. The music is good, but it doesn’t have that unity that the other Disney animated classics of the 90’s use to have, like Aladdin and The Lion King. The songs in Tangled almost seem out of place at times, and even forced. I’m not a big fan of musicals, but I was a big fan of those older Disney films, so I’m not exactly sure what the difference is here. Not that it effects the enjoyment of movie, it’s just noticeable. The musical numbers don’t seem to flow with the storytelling here. In The Little Mermaid, you almost didn’t even realize the musical numbers were happening at times. Music aside, the humor in Tangled is really fun! Not too goofy, but it does have its moments. The storyline is clean for the most part, with the exception of a few holes, but overall Tangled is a nice addition to the Disney legacy.

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“Back to the Future”
a review by Darby O’Gill

It’s almost hard to believe that it’s already been 25 years since the greatest movie ever made was released in theatres. That’s right! Back to the Future is celebrating its twenty-fifth birthday this year, and yes I said greatest movie ever made! For those of you that know me, I would imagine that that statement comes as no surprise to you, but for everyone else this movie was a huge deal to me growing-up. I went to see it in the theatre two times, which doesn’t sound like much these days, but when you’re talking about a 12 year old kid in 1985, and add to that the nearest theatre was a whole thirty-five minutes away, it’s kind of a big deal. To help celebrate the anniversary earlier this month, some theatres around the country and even the world, showed special screenings of Back to the Future once again on the big screen. As you can probably already guess, I was there to gladly get a third theatrical screening under my belt.

For those of you that are unfamiliar with this movie, I will kindly ask you to remain nameless, for I value our friendship, and wish not to judge you. In Back to the Future, a teenager named Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) worries that he’ll never amount to anything. He also, like most teenagers, can’t relate to his parents and can’t even fathom them ever being his age. Well, that is until early one morning on October 26, 1985, when his good friend Dr. Emmett Brown (Christopher Lloyd) introduces Marty to his latest invention… A time machine made out of a DeLorean!? Finally, a time machine with some style! After a series of unforeseen events, Marty finds himself unwittingly transported to November 5, 1955, and face to face with none other than his own teenage parents. Pretty heavy, huh? To make matters even worse, he may have also inadvertently stopped his parents from ever meeting, which as you can image doesn’t bode well for Marty’s future.

I think one of the things that makes this one of the greatest movies, is how amazingly well it holds-up. No matter how many times you’ve seen it, you still get tense at the clock tower scene; as if you thought the movie might end differently this time. Also by labeling 1985 as 1985 and not the present, Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale are able to preserve the movie as a period film no matter when you watch it. The only thing they have to worry about is the future, and they’ve got another 5 years before that’s a problem. Let’s just hope someone can invent the Hoverboad before then, but we’ll get more into that in about 5 years. Let’s get back to the first movie, Back to the Future did a great job of telling an amazingly creative story with a lot of humor and heart. Sadly, a movie like that would never be made today. It’s too big of a chance. Hollywood doesn’t take chances like that anymore. They like to play it safe. Let’s just make sequels and adapt already existing material. Do you realize that filmmakers these days are writing comic books in hopes of maybe being able to get it turned into a movie?! They can’t just write an amazing script anymore. They have to turn their movie ideas into something they’re not, so that someday it might be turned into the movie they wanted to make in the first place. That’s fucked up, people!! Back to the Future would never get made today, and that’s crazy because it has two successful sequels! Exactly what Hollywood wants from a movie these days! We need creative filmmakers now more than ever, and they’re out there. They just can’t catch a break, when the studio executives just want something exactly like that other something that just made money for no reason. Unfortunately, as long as there are sad little “yes men” writers out there, that are more than happy to write whatever they’re told to, the next generation of Steven Spielberg, Robert Zemeckis, and Tim Burton’s will never be heard. Wow, that got really depressing there. Back to the Future greatest movie ever made! See it if you haven’t! See it again if you have!

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(of course)